Acne Medicine

Is acne making your social life hell? Is everyone giving you their valuable advice on how to get rid of acne? Have you tried and tested everything in the market without any success? Its time to do some research and find more about the products available and the effect they have on your skin. Acne is a very personal issue and any medication you should be personalized according to your individual habits. Here is important that you find out a few things like the type of your skin. If you have oily skin then you should use gel based products where as your skin is dry then you should use an acne cream. If your skin is sensitive then you should avoid too strong products or your situation may worsen.

The main cause of acne, unlike popular belief is not dirt or dust where as it is either genetic or caused due hormonal changes like puberty. Acne can strike both boys and girls depending upon their genetic make up. The washing washing face all the time may not be the solution rather washing two to three times a day with a mild cleanser may serve the purpose.
You can choose from natural or medicated medicines. Natural medicines are made of extracts of plants and naturally occurring substances. They are generally a blend of ingredients like Vitamin E, grape seed oil, calendula, aloe vera or witch hazel and essential oils. Although even natural medication may be strong and it is a fact that should be kept in mind by people of sensitive skin.

Medicated medicines contain chemicals that dry up the pimple while acting as exfoliate. The chemicals used most commonly are benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid. The higher the percentage of chemical used, the stronger is the product. Higher concentration may harm your skin since it is important to choose wisely while applying any cream – be it medicated or natural.

Medication may be short term or prolonged dependent upon your condition. But no matter what you use it is important to alert oneself in case of any reaction or allergies that a medicine may cause if it does not suit your skin. Using medicines without proper supervision may have adverse effect and may cost you much more time and money if permanent damage occurs. Here is best advised to be careful while using any kind of medication.

Technology in Sports

It today’s world, sport cannot go together without technology. With the ever growing development of new technologies, they have always tried to be implemented into sports. Because technology can give sports something nothing else can, an unmistakable truth. Or so they say. Due to the fact that people are, well, people, they are bound to make mistakes. It is because we are human, we are not robots, that we can make mistakes, while robots make them only if they are malfunctioning. This is especially emphasized in sports, where human eyes can often deceive their owners, the referees most importantly, but also players, coaches and the fans. That is why these days there are many discussions about installing video technology into sports, mostly football. What does technology actually mean for sports?

Here I would like to emphasize that there are already sports using technology, like tennis and cricket, to name some. It helped the referees a lot, to minimize and correct some mistakes they make. But apparently, not all problems are solved like this. Players that have been playing for a longer period of time, and have not grown up with these kinds of technologies, are not convinced that it works properly. This suspicion is probably understandable, because when they were first starting their professional sports careers, they did not probably even dream about something like this would exist. But this technology has been tested time after time, and skeptical players, such as Roger Federer, have learned to live with it and accept it, although probably not so reluctantly.

This technology used in sports is called Hawk-Eye line-calling system, or just Hawk-eye for short. It was invented by a British computer expert Paul Hawkins. It is now used in tennis, where six or more cameras, situated around the court are linked together, track the path of the ball. Then those six or more cameras combine their separate views and make a 3D representation of the path of the ball. For tennis, or basically any other sport, this means that any close line call can be checked, quickly and accurately. This is not always used on tennis tournaments, though. For instance, the French Open is not using this technology because the tournament is played on clay courts and thus the print of the ball on the ground can easily be seen. Maybe this will change one day, because you can’t always be 100% sure you are looking at the right print.

These days there have been a lot of talks about introducing this technology to the sport of football. The sympathizers of this idea have been especially loud after the South Africa FIFA World Cup 2010, where a lot of mistakes by the referees have been made (an Argentina goal allowed although the player was offside, England goal not seen in a crucial moment). However, referees are only human, and they are bound to make mistakes because they can not help it, so i do not think all those critics were fair to them. On the other hand, a recent statement was made from the UEFA president Michel Platini, who is not thrilled about the goal-line technology, saying that this would reduce football to a video game. I don’t believe that other sports who have this technology have been reduced to a video game. Furthermore, he also admits that referees can make mistakes and that there are many cameras on the field that can catch any disputable moment. So why not help football, or any other sport, to see these disputable moments clearly and to resolve them without making mistakes. Or is it better to hear a mass of critics every time something like this happens? I am sure the referees would like this kind of help, then they couldn’t be blamed for anything and wouldn’t have to listen to all the nonsense people say about them the other day, or worse.

Why Do We Wear Engagement Rings?

The modern Western practice of giving or breaking engagement rings is traditionally thought to have begon in 1477 when Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, wave Mary of Burgundy a diamond ring as an engagement present.

Customs for engagement rings vary according to time, place, and culture. An engagement ring has historically been uncommon, and when such a gift was given, it was separate from the wedding ring. Romantic rings from the time of the Roman Empire and from as far back as 4 AD often clash the Celtic Claddagh symbol (two hands clasping a heart) and so it is thought that this was used as some symbol of love and commitment between two people.

In the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia, and many other countries, an engagement ring is worn on the fourth finger of the left hand. The tradition of wearing a ring for engagement originated from the Egyptians who believed the circle was a bond between the two people who were to be married, but was initially first practiced on the fourth finger / ring finger by the Romans, who recognized this finger to Be the beginning of the vena amoris ("vein of love"), the vein that leads to the heart. The custom in Continental Europe and other countries is to wear it on the right hand; one historical exception arose in monarchical regimes, in which a nobleman entering into morganatic marriage (a marriage in which the person, usually the woman, of lower rank stayed at the same rank instead of rising ranks) would present his left hand to receive the ring (hence the alternative term "left-handed marriage").

In other countries like Argentina, men and women each wear a ring similar to wedding bands. They are made of silver when manifesting an informal "boyfriend-girlfriend" relationship. The gold band is given to the bride when the commitment is formal and the optional diamond ring is reserved for the wedding ceremony when the groom gives it to the bride. The gold band that the groom wore during the engagement – or a new one, as some men choose not to wear them during engagement – is then given to the groom by the bride; and the bride receives both the original gold band and the new diamond at the ceremony. The bride's diamond ring is worn on top of the engagement band at the wedding and thereafter, especially at formal occasions or parties. At the wedding, the rings are swapped from the right to the left hand. In Brazil, they are always made of gold, and there is no tradition for the engagement ring. Both men and women wear the wedding band on their right hand while engaged, and, after they marry, they shift the rings to their left hands. In Nordic countries such as Finland and Norway, both men and women wear an engagement ring.

Some women's wedding rings are made into two separate pieces. One part is given to her to wear as an engagement ring when she accepts the marriage proposal and the other during the wedding ceremony.

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Diamond Earrings and Other Fine Jewelry

Diamond rings are the most common form of diamond jewelry, but diamond earrings, bracelets and necklaces are also quite popular. In fact, diamond jewelry has been around since the days of the Roman Empire, although it took almost 1500 years before diamond jewelers had figured out how to cut diamonds into attractive shapes that displayed their "fire," or shine and brilliance. Diamond earrings are but one way that people adorn themselves with this mystical, precious gem.

A Fascinating History

Chances are that the first diamond jewelry was from India. The tremendous geologic forces required to form diamonds exists mainly in regions of the world where one tectonic plate slams into another; the Himalayas, where the Indian subcontinent plows into Central Asia, is one such place. Loose diamonds from deep underneath these mountains have been known to appear in the rivers that flow south and westward from the Himalayas: the Ganges, the Brahmaputra and the Irriwaddy have all been sources of these rough, octagonal crystals.

Before diamond jewelers had learned the art of precision cutting, diamond earrings were not particularly beautiful; rough and dull-looking, they were nonetheless prized for their hardness.

One early example of diamond jewelry in the West was actually a crown made for a Hungarian princess well over 1000 years ago. One of the first diamond wedding ring was the one given to Marie of Burgundy on the occasion of her wedding to Archduke Maximilian I of Austria in 1477. It was not until over fifty years later however during the reign of Henry VIII of England that diamond cutting had reached a level that was suitable for jewelry such as diamond earrings.

Dull and Lifeless

If you had been buying diamonds back then, you'd have been disappointed; those early cuts did not show the kind of brilliance that we see in fine diamond jewelry today. It was not until the 1800s that art of diamond cutting had reached a level of refinement that allowed the gem's real beauty to shine through the way it does in contemporary diamond jewelry.

Fiery and Brilliant

Today, there are many different cuts to choose from when buying diamonds . Round cuts and square cuts both have characteristics in their favor, but a reliably new cut, called the "princess," has been gaining in popularity over the past thirty years or so. This particular cut combines the best features of round and square cuts, and causes the least wastage of all cutting methods – so the gem retains much more of its original weight. All three cuts however will make for highly attractive and valuable diamond earrings .